Welcome to Microwave-Link.com

Welcome to Microwave-Link.com

Find out information on technology, deployment and applications for modern Digital Microwave Links

Microwave Link
CableFree MW Link installed on a telecom tower

Microwave links are widely used for connectivity in modern digital IP networks. With capacities up to 3Gbps and beyond, a modern Microwave Link network can deliver bandwidth in a reliable, cost-effective and flexible manner – without need for disruption and delay caused by digging up streets and avoiding costly leased-line or leased fibre optic alternatives.

On this website you can find more information about radio link deployment and technology.  Also we invite you to contact our experts with any questions by sending a message to us on our contact page.

CableFree Microwave Links used for Mobile Backhaul
CableFree MW Radio Links used for Mobile Backhaul

Microwave links are used extensively in 4G/LTE backhaul networks, 2G (GSM) and 3G (UMTS) mobile operators, wireless metropolitan area networks (Wi-MAN) and corporate networks where high performance, flexibility, speed of deployment and low operating costs are required.  Key features of links include high spectral efficiency (256QAM, 1024QAM, 2048QAM and 4096QAM), Automatic Transmit Power Control (ATPC) and Adaptive Coding and Modulation (ACM).

Globally, MW radio links are used for around 60% of all mobile backhaul connections due to the compelling technical and commercial arguments in favour of MW radio compared to leased line and trenched fibre alternatives.  Speed of deployment and flexibility – the ability to move sites or provision rapidly – are greatly in favour of MW radio over fibre and cabled alternatives.

A Full Outdoor Microwave Link installed for ISP in Iraq with 880Mbps Full Duplex Capacity
A Full Outdoor Microwave Link installed for ISP in Iraq with 880Mbps Full Duplex Capacity

A  link typically features a radio unit and a parabolic antenna, which may vary in size from 30cm up to 4m diameter depending on required distance and capacity.  The radio unit is generally either a “Full Outdoor”, “Split Mount” or “Full Indoor” design depending on operator preference, deployment, features and available indoor space for specific sites and installation.

CableFree FOR3 Full Outdoor 1024QAM Microwave Link
Full Outdoor 1024QAM MW Radio Link

For More information on MW Radio Links please Contact Us

 

Split Mount Radio Microwave Links

Split Mount Radio (IDU+ODU)

A Split Mount Microwave Radio consisted of Indoor plus Outdoor components – specifically Indoor Unit (IDU) and Outdoor Unit (ODU)

Split Mount Microwave Radios offer up to 500 Mbps and 1Gbps Full Duplex payload  and higher up to 6Gbps or more, in 4-42GHz licensed frequency bands.

Indoor Unit (IDU)

CableFree HCR Indoor Unit (IDU) Split Mount Radio
CableFree HCR Indoor Unit (IDU)

A Typical Split Mount Radio consists of a 19″ Rack Mount Indoor Unit which is mounted in a rack, cabinet, comms room, or even roof-mount shelter as possible locations.

Outdoor Unit (ODU)

CableFree Microwave Link ODU using 30cm antenna Split Mount Radio
CableFree Microwave Link Outdoor Unit (ODU) with using 30cm antenna mounted on a pole

The Outdoor Unit (ODU) is typically mounted directly to the Microwave Antenna on a rooftop or tower location, which enables clear Line of Sight (LOS) between both ends of the Microwave link.

For most bands above 6GHz the ODU has a waveguide interface which enables efficient, low-loss connection directly to the antenna.  For lower bands below 6GHz, commonly a coaxial cable is used between the ODU and the antenna.

In certain cases, the ODU can be remote mounted from the antenna, and a waveguide used to connect between them

Comparison with Full Outdoor Radios

A split mount radio is considered a “traditional” design and older radios always feature this.  The Indoor Unit has all the network interfaces and processing in the easy-access indoor location at the foot the tower or building.  Full Outdoor Radios by contrast have all the active items including the modem and user network interfaces inside the rooftop radio element.  This saves on space, materials, installation time and cost.  A downside is that in the event of any failure, a tower climb is almost always needed to rectify any fault, which may be impossible in rough weather, or require permits or have access limitations to reach

Distances and Range Capability of Split Mount Radios

Using suitable antennas and sites, ultra-long-distance links exceeding 100km can be achieved.   Distances depend on:

  • Frequency band
  • Regional Rainfall
  • Required throughput (Mbps)
  • Desired Availability (%)
  • Antenna size (gain)

For Further Information

For more information on Full Outdoor Radios and Microwave Networks please Contact Us

 

Microwave Waveguide Flange

Introduction to Microwave Waveguide Flanges

A waveguide flange is a connector for joining sections of waveguide, and is essentially the same as a pipe flange—a waveguide, in the context of this article, being a hollow metal conduit for microwave energy. The connecting face of the flange is either square, circular or (particularly for large or reduced-height rectangular waveguides), rectangular. The connection between a pair of flanges is usually made with four or more bolts, though alternative mechanisms, such as a threaded collar, may be used where there is a need for rapid assembly and disassembly. Dowel pins are sometimes used in addition to bolts, to ensure accurate alignment, particularly for very small waveguides where higher accuracy is required for higher frequencies.

Key features of a waveguide join are; whether or not it is air-tight, allowing the waveguide to be pressurized, and whether it is a contact or a choke connection. This leads to three sorts of flange for each size of rectangular waveguide.

For rectangular waveguides there exist a number of competing standard flanges which are not entirely mutually compatible. Standard flange designs also exist for double-ridge, reduced-height, square and circular waveguides.

Microwave Waveguide Flange IEC EIA
EIA and IEC Microwave Waveguide Flange versions

Unpressurised and Pressurised Waveguide Flanges

The atmosphere within waveguide assemblies is often pressurized, either to prevent the ingress of moisture, or to raise the breakdown voltage in the guide and hence increase the power that it can carry. Pressurization requires that all joints in the waveguide be airtight. This is usually achieved by means of a rubber O-ring seated in a groove in the face of at least one of flanges forming each join. Gasket, gasket/cover or pressurizable flanges (such as that on the right of figure 2), are identifiable by the single circular groove which accommodates the O-ring. It is only necessary for one of the flanges in each pressurizable connection to be of this type; the other may have a plain flat face (like that in figure 1). This ungrooved type is known as a cover, plain or unpressurizable flange.

It is also possible to form air-tight seal between a pair of otherwise unpressurizable flanges using a flat gasket made out of a special electrically conductive elastomer. Two plain cover flanges may be mated without such a gasket, but the connection is then not pressurizable.

Electrical continuity

Electric current flows on the inside surface of the waveguides, and must cross the join between them if microwave power is to pass through the connection without reflection or loss.

Microwave Flange Standards

IEC

International Electrotechnical Commission (IEC) standard IEC 60154 describes flanges for square and circular waveguides, as well as for what it refers to as flat, medium-flat, and ordinary rectangular guides.  IEC flanges are identified by an alphanumeric code consisting of; the letter U, P or C for Unpressurizable (plain cover), Pressurizable (with a gasket groove) and Choke (with both choke gasket grooves); a second letter, indicating the shape and other details of the flange and finally the IEC identifier for the waveguide. For standard rectangular waveguide the second letter is A to E, where A and C are round flanges, B is square and D and E are rectangular. So for example UBR220 is a square plain cover flange for R220 waveguide (that is, for WG20, WR42), PDR84 is a rectangular gasket flange for R84 waveguide (WG15, WR112) and CAR70 is a round choke flange for R70 waveguide (WG14, WR137).

MIL-Spec

MIL-DTL-3922 is a United States Military Standard giving detailed descriptions of choke, gasket/cover and cover flanges for rectangular waveguide. MIL_DTL-39000/3 describes flanges for double-ridge waveguide, and formerly also for single-ridge guide.  MIL-Spec flanges have designations of the form UG-xxxx/U where the x’s represent a variable-length catalogue number, not in itself containing any information about the flange.

EIA

The Electronic Industries Alliance (EIA) is the body that defined the WR designations for standard rectangular waveguides. EIA flanges are designated CMR (for Connector, Miniature, Rectangular waveguide) or CPR (Connector, Pressurizable, Rectangular waveguide) followed by the EIA number (WR number) for the relevant waveguide. So for example, CPR112 is a gasket flange for waveguide WR112 (WG15).

RCSC

The Radio Components Standardization Committee (RCSC) is the body that originated the WG designations for standard rectangular waveguides. It also defined standard choke and cover flanges with identifiers of the form 5985-99-xxx-xxxx where the x’s represent a catalogue number, not in itself containing any information about the flange.

What is a Waveguide?

A waveguide is an electromagnetic feed line that is used for high frequency signals. Waveguides conduct microwave energy at lower loss than coaxial cables and are used in microwave communications, radars and other high frequency applications.

The waveguide must have a certain minimum cross section, relative to the wavelength of the signal to function properly. If wavelength of the signal is too long (Frequency is too low) when compared to the cross section of the waveguide, the electromagnetic fields cannot propagate. The lowest frequency range at which a waveguide will operate is where the cross section is large enough to fit one complete wavelength of the signal.

For Further Information

For More Information on Microwave Planning, Please Contact Us

V-Band 60GHz Millimeter Wave MMW Technology

Multi-Gigabit Links using V-Band 60GHz Millimeter Wave MMW Technology

So-called “V-Band” refers to high frequency microwave signals in the Millimeter Wave radio bands which enable high capacity wireless communications.  The band is useful for moderate distances up to around 1km with clear “line of sight”, and for short-range mobile devices.  In many countries, V-band is “Unlicensed” (license free) which encourages widespread use.

What is 60GHz V-band technology?

The V band (“vee-band”) is a standard designation by the Institute of Electrical and Electronic Engineers (IEEE) for a band of frequencies in the microwave portion of the electromagnetic spectrum ranging from 40 to 75 gigahertz (GHz).The V band is not heavily used, except for millimeter wave radar research and other kinds of scientific research. It should not be confused with the 600–1000 MHz range of Band-V (band-five) of the UHF frequency range.

CableFree V-Band 60GHz MMW Link
CableFree V-Band 60GHz MMW Link with High Gain parabolic antenna

The V band is also used for high capacity terrestrial millimeter wave communications systems. In the United States, the Federal Communications Commission has allocated the frequency band from 57 to 71 GHz for unlicensed wireless systems. These systems are primarily used for high capacity, short distance (less than 1 mile) communications. In addition, frequencies at 70, 80, and 90 GHz have been allocated as “lightly licensed” bands for multi-gigabit wireless communications. All communications links in the V band require unobstructed line of sight between the transmit and receive point, and rain fade must be taken into account when performing link budget analysis.

Applications for 60GHz V-band

Very short range Wi-Fi

The Wi-Fi standard IEEE 802.11ad utilizes the 60 GHz (EHF microwave) spectrum with data transfer rates of up to 7 Gbit/s for very short ranges of up to 10 metres (33 ft).  Also the newer IEEE 802.11ay uses the same band.  Where 802.11ad uses a maximum of 2.16 GHz bandwidth, 802.11ay bonds four of those channels together for a maximum bandwidth of 8.64 GHz. MIMO is also added with a maximum of 4 streams. The link-rate per stream is 44Gbit/s, with four streams this goes up to 176Gbit/s. Higher order modulation is also added, probably up to 256-QAM.

Mobile backhaul

As mobile operators need more and more bandwidth, they are turning to new frequency bands to lower their wireless backhaul costs. Both license-exempt V band spectrum (57-71 GHz) and E band spectrum (71-76 GHz, 81-86 GHz and 92-95 GHz) have clear technological and economic advantages. The 27 GHz allocated in these bands allows multi-Gigabit per second capacities far exceeding the 6-38 GHz bandwidth-limited frequencies.

In the V band and E band spectrum, wireless systems can utilize the significantly larger allocated spectrum and channels to deliver multi-Gigabit data rates. This enables a simple, robust, and low cost modem and radio design. Thus, V-Band and E-Band, millimeter-wave wireless systems provide significant cost advantages over 6-38 GHz wireless systems – allowing scaling capacity to Gigabit capacities, without additional radio equipment and licensing fees.

Wireless broadband

Internet service providers are looking for ways to expand gigabit high-speed services to their customers. These can be achieved through fiber to the premises broadband network architecture, or a more affordable alternative using fixed wireless in the last mile in combination with the fiber networks in the middle mile in order to reduce the costs of trenching fiber optic cables to the users. In the United States, V band is unlicensed. This makes V band an appealing choice to be used as fixed wireless access for gigabit services to connect to homes and businesses.

Satellite constellations

As of March 2017, several US companies—Boeing, SpaceX, OneWeb, Telesat, O3b Networks and Theia Holdings—have each filed with the US regulatory authorities “plans to field constellations of V-band satellites in non-geosynchronous orbits to provide communications services,” an electromagnetic spectrum that had not previously been “heavily employed for commercial communications services.”

V-Band Regulations and Licensing

In many countries, V-band is “Unlicensed” (license free) which encourages widespread use.  A few countries retain 60GHz for licensed or defence applications.  The specific frequencies which are allowed to be used can vary between different countries.

For More Information on V-Band Millimeter Wave

For more information on V-Band MMW, Please Contact Us

Point to Point Microwave Link

Wireless Point-to-Point Microwave Bridge Links

Microwave Point to Point can be tailored to suit the needs and requirements of all applications

CableFree FOR3 Point to Point Microwave P2P PTP Installed in the Middle East
CableFree FOR3 Microwave P2P link Installed in the Middle East

Point to Point links are transparent, acting as an extension of the Ethernet backbone or segment. Licensed Microwave is fully compatible with the Ethernet standard, and supports all Ethernet functionality and applications.

Point to Point Microwave has been the connectivity choice for Telecom carriers, corporate organisations and Government authorities for many of years. Point to Point Radio offers high speeds, high availability over large connection distances, it can be relied upon to carry voice and data traffic in a number of bandwidth-intensive applications, such as:

  • Connecting locations that are unavailable or in poor Broadband areas
  • Private data Networks (WANs, LANs, etc.)
  • Utility Networks (Railways, Pipelines, etc.)
  • Last Mile access for Corporate, SMEs and Local Government
  • Connecting buildings and facilities over large distances

Microwave P2P – Ideal replacement for Fibre Optics and Leased Lines

CableFree Microwave Link using 30cm antenna benefits from ACM giving longer reach and higher availability
CableFree Microwave Link using 30cm antenna benefits from ACM giving longer reach and higher availability

Point to point wireless is the ideal alternative for business communication between two buildings or sites where wired connection is either impossible, costly or impractical. Point to point Ethernet bridge link facilitates a wireless data connection between two or more networks or buildings across distances up to 100 Kilometres and at speeds up to 1Gbps.

Point to point wireless links are an excellent alternative to fibre optics and leased lines, providing businesses with fibre-like speeds for high-speed data, voice and video transfer between business locations.

Asking an expert team to assist with your point to point wireless requirement will ensure you get a well-designed Microwave Link solution and expertise to help you and your business to benefit from high-capacity, low-latency, long distance wireless data transfer. Quality design, installation and support teams are always on-hand to ensure that your project is delivered on time and to the highest standards.

Long Distance Point to Point WiFi

WiFi is sometimes used for outdoor links – with directional antennas – despite the WiFi radio protocol not being optimised for long distance links.  Instead, customised airside protocols on dedicated outdoor radios are far better for security, throughput and link stability.

Point to Point Ethernet bridge

CableFree Microwave Point to Point Radio Links P2P PTP
CableFree Microwave Point to Point Radio Links

A point to point Ethernet bridge link can benefit your business through the elimination of leasing lines or subscription based systems with no loss in performance. Providing highly reliable connections, point to point wireless offers a far lower total cost of ownership and has the versatility of deployment within rural, metropolitan and residential environments.

Whether you are looking to achieve high-speed business networking or to provide wireless backhaul for CCTV connectivity, point to point bridges are the best option.

Where line-of-sight (LOS) exists between two points, point to point bridge pairs can be set-up and installed with the minimum of disruption to your business and can usually be completed within a single day. The ease of install and the resilience to harsh weather conditions make point to point bridge links a viable fibre alternative.

Operating in both licensed and unlicensed spectrums, our point to point solutions ensure that your business has the network uptime and performance for mission-critical data transfer – our links offer 99.999% uptime.

Broadcasting, construction or military environments often require temporary wireless connections. The simplicity of point to point WiFi makes it the perfect solution where temporary wireless connection is required between two points.

Licensed or Unlicensed Point to Point Microwave Links

When selecting the correct point to point wireless link for your business, there are a number of important decisions to be made to ensure that the final outcome meets the initial expectations. Point to point microwave links can be either licenced or unlicensed, both of which have a specific set of capabilities, advantages and disadvantages, the main one being their relative susceptibility to interference-free operation.

For businesses seeking a wireless backhaul which will serve as a direct replacement for leased lines, licensed microwave links – which operate within the ‘licensed’ 4-42GHz bands, – will provide superior bandwidth availability, speed and the interference protection necessary.

Although offering no guaranteed interference protection, unlicensed microwave links which operate in the ‘unlicensed’ frequency bands, either typically in 2.4 and 5GHz bands, in some regions 17GHz and 24GHz, and 58GHz/60GHz (V-band), can provide a more cost effective option as they eliminate any additional costs and can be rapidly deployed.

For Further Information

For More Information on Microwave Planning, Please Contact Us

Microwave Waveguide Sizes & Dimensions

Microwave Waveguide Sizes

Microwave Waveguide
Microwave Waveguide

Due to high frequencies used, Waveguides rather than RF coaxial cables are used to connect Microwave Radios, Antennas and Couplers.  Matched and correct size and dimension of Waveguide is essential for all items in the Microwave link.

What is a Waveguide?

A waveguide is an electromagnetic feed line that is used for high frequency signals. Waveguides conduct microwave energy at lower loss than coaxial cables and are used in microwave communications, radars and other high frequency applications.

The waveguide must have a certain minimum cross section, relative to the wavelength of the signal to function properly. If wavelength of the signal is too long (Frequency is too low) when compared to the cross section of the waveguide, the electromagnetic fields cannot propagate. The lowest frequency range at which a waveguide will operate is where the cross section is large enough to fit one complete wavelength of the signal.

Rectangular, Circular and Double Rigid

Geometrically speaking there are three types of waveguides – Rectangular Waveguides, Double Rigid Waveguides and Circular Waveguides. The tables below will give you details on the various waveguide sizes and their properties.

Rectangular Waveguide Sizes

Waveguide name Recommended frequency Cutoff frequency
lowest order mode
Cutoff frequency
next mode
Inner dimensions of waveguide opening
EIA RCSC * IEC A inch[mm] B inch[mm]
WR2300 WG0.0 R3 0.32 to 0.45 GHz 0.257 GHz 0.513 GHz 23 [584.2] 11.5 [292.1]
WR2100 WG0 R4 0.35 to 0.50 GHz 0.281 GHz 0.562 GHz 21 [533.4] 10.5 [266.7]
WR1800 WG1 R5 0.45 to 0.63 GHz 0.328 GHz 0.656 GHz 18 [457.2] 9 [228.6]
WR1500 WG2 R6 0.50 to 0.75 GHz 0.393 GHz 0.787 GHz 15 [381] 7.5 [190.5]
WR1150 WG3 R8 0.63 to 0.97 GHz 0.513 GHz 1.026 GHz 11.5 [292.1] 5.75 [146.05]
WR975 WG4 R9 0.75 to 1.15 GHz 0.605 GHz 1.211 GHz 9.75 [247.65] 4.875 [123.825]
WR770 WG5 R12 0.97 to 1.45 GHz 0.766 GHz 1.533 GHz 7.7 [195.58] 3.85 [97.79]
WR650 WG6 R14 1.15 to 1.72 GHz 0.908 GHz 1.816 GHz 6.5 [165.1] 3.25 [82.55]
WR510 WG7 R18 1.45 to 2.20 GHz 1.157 GHz 2.314 GHz 5.1 [129.54] 2.55 [64.77]
WR430 WG8 R22 1.72 to 2.60 GHz 1.372 GHz 2.745 GHz 4.3 [109.22] 2.15 [54.61]
WG9 2.20 to 3.30 GHz 1.686 GHz 3.372 GHz 3.5 [88.9] 1.75 [44.45]
WR340 WG9A R26 2.20 to 3.30 GHz 1.736 GHz 3.471 GHz 3.4 [86.36] 1.7 [43.18]
WR4284 WG10 R32 2.60 to 3.95 GHz 2.078 GHz 4.156 GHz 2.84 [72.136] 1.34 [34.036]
WG11 3.30 to 4.90 GHz 2.488 GHz 4.976 GHz 2.372 [60.2488] 1.122 [28.4988]
WR229 WG11A R40 3.30 to 4.90 GHz 2.577 GHz 5.154 GHz 2.29 [58.166] 1.145 [29.083]
WR187 WG12 R48 3.95 to 5.85 GHz 3.153 GHz 6.305 GHz 1.872 [47.5488] 0.872 [22.1488]
WR159 WG13 R58 4.90 to 7.05 GHz 3.712 GHz 7.423 GHz 1.59 [40.386] 0.795 [20.193]
WR137 WG14 R70 5.85 to 8.20 GHz 4.301 GHz 8.603 GHz 1.372 [34.8488] 0.622 [15.7988
WR112 WG15 R84 7.05 to 10 GHz 5.26 GHz 10.52 GHz 1.122 [28.4988] 0.497 [12.6238]
WR102 7.00 to 11 GHz 5.786 GHz 11.571 GHz 1.02 [25.908] 0.51 [12.954]
WR90 WG16 R100 8.20 to 12.40 GHz 6.557 GHz 13.114 GHz 0.9 [22.86] 0.4 [10.16]
WR75 WG17 R120 10.00 to 15 GHz 7.869 GHz 15.737 GHz 0.75 [19.05] 0.375 [9.525]
WR62 WG18 R140 12.40 to 18 GHz 9.488 GHz 18.976 GHz 0.622 [15.7988] 0.311 [7.8994]
WR51 WG19 R180 15.00 to 22 GHz 11.572 GHz 23.143 GHz 0.51 [12.954] 0.255 [6.477]
WR42 WG20 R220 18.00 to 26.50 GHz 14.051 GHz 28.102 GHz 0.42 [10.668] 0.17 [4.318]
WR34 WG21 R260 22.00 to 33 GHz 17.357 GHz 34.715 GHz 0.34 [8.636] 0.17 [4.318]
WR28 WG22 R320 26.50 to 40 GHz 21.077 GHz 42.154 GHz 0.28 [7.112] 0.14 [3.556]
WR22 WG23 R400 33.00 to 50 GHz 26.346 GHz 52.692 GHz 0.224 [5.6896] 0.112 [2.8448]
WR19 WG24 R500 40.00 to 60 GHz 31.391 GHz 62.782 GHz 0.188 [4.7752] 0.094 [2.3876]
WR15 WG25 R620 50.00 to 75 GHz 39.875 GHz 79.75 GHz 0.148 [3.7592] 0.074 [1.8796]
WR12 WG26 R740 60 to 90 GHz 48.373 GHz 96.746 GHz 0.122 [3.0988] 0.061 [1.5494]
WR10 WG27 R900 75 to 110 GHz 59.015 GHz 118.03 GHz 0.1 [2.54] 0.05 [1.27]
WR8 WG28 R1200 90 to 140 GHz 73.768 GHz 147.536 GHz 0.08 [2.032] 0.04 [1.016]
WR6 WG29 R1400 110 to 170 GHz 90.791 GHz 181.583 GHz 0.065 [1.651] 0.0325 [0.8255]
WR7 WG29 R1400 110 to 170 GHz 90.791 GHz 181.583 GHz 0.065 [1.651] 0.0325 [0.8255]
WR5 WG30 R1800 140 to 220 GHz 115.714 GHz 231.429 GHz 0.051 [1.2954] 0.0255 [0.6477]
WR4 WG31 R2200 172 to 260 GHz 137.243 GHz 274.485 GHz 0.043 [1.0922] 0.0215 [0.5461]
WR3 WG32 R2600 220 to 330 GHz 173.571 GHz 347.143 GHz 0.034 [0.8636] 0.017 [0.4318]

Note:

  • The “WR” designation stands for Rectangular Waveguides
  • The Number that follows “WR” is the width of the waveguide opening in mils, divided by 10. For Example WR-650 means a waveguide whose cross section width is 6500 mils.
  • The waveguide width determines the lower cutoff frequency and is equal (ideally) to ½ wavelength of the lower cutoff frequency.

Double-ridge waveguides are rectangular wagevuides with two ridges protruding parallel to the short wall. This increases the E-Field in the waveguide improving performance.

Double Ridge Waveguide Sizes

Designation
(a)=aluminum, (b)=brass, (c)=copper, (s)=silver
fL – fU*
(GHz)
fCO**
(GHz)
Inside
Width
(in)
Inside
Height
(in)
WR U.S. Mil.
__ /U
British
Mil.
IEC
WR975 RG204 (a) 0.75-1.12 0.605 9.750 4.875
WR770 RG205 (a) 0.96-1.45 0.766 7.700 3.850
WR650 RG69 (b)
RG103 (a)
WG6 1.12-1.70 0.908 6.500 3.250
WR510 1.45-2.20 1.157 5.100 2.550
WR430 RG104 (b)
RG105 (a)
WG8 1.70-2.60 1.372 4.300 2.150
WR340  RG112 (b)
RG113 (a)
WG9A 2.20-3.30 1.736 3.400 1.700
WR284 RG48 (b)
RG75 (a)
WG10 2.60-3.95 2.078 2.840 1.340
WR229  RG340 (c)
RG341 (a)
WG11A R40 3.30-4.90 2.577 2.290 1.145
WR187 RG49 (b)
RG95 (a)
WG12 R48 3.95-5.85- 3.152 1.872 0.872
WR159  RG343 (c)
RG344 (a)
WG13 R58 4.90-7.05 3.712 1.590 0.795
WR137 RG50 (b)
RG106 (a)
WG14 R70 5.850-8.200 4.301 1.372 0.622
WR112 RG51 (b)
RG68 (a)
WG15 R84 7.050-10.000 5.260 1.122 0.497
WR90 RG52 (b)
RG67 (a)
WG16 R100 8.20-12.40 6.56 0.900 0.400
WR75  RG346 (c)
RG347 (a)
WG17 10.0-15.0 7.87 0.750 0.375
WR62 RG91 (b)
RG349 (a)
WG18 12.40-18.00 9.49 0.622 0.311
WR51  RG352 (c)
RG351 (a)
WG19 15.00-22.00 11.6 0.510 0.255
WR42 RG53 (b)
RG121 (a)
WG20 18.00-26.5 14.1 0.420 0.170
WR34 RG354 (c) 20.0-33.0 17.4 0.340 0.170
WR28 RG96 (s)
RG271 (c)
WG22 26.50-40.00 21.1 0.280 0.140
WR22 RG97 (s) WG23 33.00-50.00 26.4 0.224 0.112
WR19 WG24 40.00-60.00 31.4 0.188 0.0940
WR15 RG98 (s) WG25 50.00-75.00 39.9 0.148 0.0740
WR12 RG99 (s) WG26 60.00-90.00 48.4 0.122 0.0610
WR10 WG27 75.00-110.0 59.0 0.100 0.0500
WR8 RG138 (s) WG28 90.00-140.0 73.8 0.0800 0.0400
WR7 RG136 (s) 110.0-170.0 90.8 0.0650 0.0325
WR4 RG137 170.0-260.0 137 0.0430 0.0215
WR3 RG139 (s) 220.0-325.0 174 0.0340 0.0170

 

Circular Waveguide Sizes

FrequencyBand Frequency Range Circular WaveguideDiameter, Inches (mm) Cover Flange (Brass)MIL-F- 3922 UG Flange Type
X LOW 8.2-9.97 1.094 (27.79) 53-001 UG-39/U Square
MID 8.5-11.6 0.938 (23.83)
HIGH 9.97-12.4 0.797 (20.24)
Ku LOW 12.4-15.9 0.688 (17.48) 53-005 UG-1666/U Square
MID 13.4-18.0 0.594 (15.08)
HIGH 15.9-18.0 0.500 (12.70)
K LOW 17.5-20.5 0.455 (11.56) 54-001 UG-595/U Square
MID 20-24.5 0.396 (10.06)
HIGH 24-26.5 0.328 (8.33)
Ka LOW 26.5-33 0.315 (8.00) 54-003 UG-595/U Square
MID 33-38.5 0.250 (6.35)
HIGH 38.5-40 0.219 (5.56)
Q LOW 33-38.5 0.250 (6.35) 67B-006 UG-383/U Round
MID 38.5-43 0.219 (5.56)
HIGH 43-50 0.188 (4.78)
U LOW 40-43 0.210 (5.33) 67B-007 UG-383/U-M Round
MID 43-50 0.188 (4.78)
HIGH 50-60 0.165 (4.19)
V LOW 50-58 0.165 (4.19) 67B-008 UG-385/U Round
MID 58-68 0.141 (3.58)
HIGH 68-75 0.125 (3.18)
E LOW 60-66 0.136 (3.45) 67B-009 UG-387/U Round
MID 66-82 0.125 (3.18)
HIGH 82-90 0.094 (2.39)
W LOW 75-88 0.112 (2.84) 67B-010 UG-387/U-M Round
HIGH 88-110 0.094 (2.39)
F LOW 90-115 0.089 (2.26) -UG-387/U-M Round
HIGH 115-140 0.075 (1.91)
D LOW 110-140 0.073 (1.85) -UG-387/U-M Round
HIGH 140-160 0.059 (1.50)
G LOW 140-180 0.058 (1.47) -UG-387/U-M Round
HIGH 180-220 0.045 (1.14)
170-260 0.049 (1.25) -UG-387/U-M Round
220-325 0.039 (0.99) -UG-387/U-M Round

 

WR3 | WG32 | R2600 Waveguide

WR3 | WG32 | R2600 Waveguide Sizes

WR3 | WG32 | R2600 Rectangular Waveguide Size

  • EIA Standard (WR):WR3
  • RSCS Standard (British Military):WG32
  • IEC Standard:R2600

WR3 Specifications

  • Recommended Frequency Band:220 to 330 GHz
  • Cutoff Frequency of Lowest Order Mode:173.571 GHz
  • Cutoff Frequency of Upper Mode:347.143 GHz
  • Dimension:0.034 Inches [0.8636 mm] x 0.017 Inches [0.4318 mm]

 

Microwave Waveguide WR3
Microwave Waveguide

What is a Waveguide?

A waveguide is an electromagnetic feed line that is used for high frequency signals. Waveguides conduct microwave energy at lower loss than coaxial cables and are used in microwave communications, radars and other high frequency applications.

The waveguide must have a certain minimum cross section, relative to the wavelength of the signal to function properly. If wavelength of the signal is too long (Frequency is too low) when compared to the cross section of the waveguide, the electromagnetic fields cannot propagate. The lowest frequency range at which a waveguide will operate is where the cross section is large enough to fit one complete wavelength of the signal.

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WR4 | WG31 | R2200 Waveguide

WR4 | WG31 | R2200 – Rectangular Waveguide Size

WR4 | WG31 | R2200 Waveguide Size

  • EIA Standard:WR4
  • RSCS Standard (British Military):WG31
  • IEC Standard:R2200

WR4 Specifications

  • Recommended Frequency Band:172 to 260 GHz
  • Cutoff Frequency of Lowest Order Mode:137.243 GHz
  • Cutoff Frequency of Upper Mode:274.485 GHz
  • Dimension:0.043 Inches [1.0922 mm] x 0.0215 Inches [0.5461 mm]

 

Microwave Waveguide WR2300
Microwave Waveguide

What is a Waveguide?

A waveguide is an electromagnetic feed line that is used for high frequency signals. Waveguides conduct microwave energy at lower loss than coaxial cables and are used in microwave communications, radars and other high frequency applications.

The waveguide must have a certain minimum cross section, relative to the wavelength of the signal to function properly. If wavelength of the signal is too long (Frequency is too low) when compared to the cross section of the waveguide, the electromagnetic fields cannot propagate. The lowest frequency range at which a waveguide will operate is where the cross section is large enough to fit one complete wavelength of the signal.

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WR5 | WG30 | R1800 Waveguide

WR5 | WG30 | R1800 – Rectangular Waveguide Size

WR5 | WG30 | R1800 Waveguide Size

  • EIA Standard:WR5
  • RSCS Standard (British Military):WG30
  • IEC Standard:R1800

WR5 Specifications

  • Recommended Frequency Band:140 to 220 GHz
  • Cutoff Frequency of Lowest Order Mode:115.714 GHz
  • Cutoff Frequency of Upper Mode:231.429 GHz
  • Dimension:0.051 Inches [1.2954 mm] x 0.0255 Inches [0.6477 mm]

 

Microwave Waveguide WR2300
Microwave Waveguide

What is a Waveguide?

A waveguide is an electromagnetic feed line that is used for high frequency signals. Waveguides conduct microwave energy at lower loss than coaxial cables and are used in microwave communications, radars and other high frequency applications.

The waveguide must have a certain minimum cross section, relative to the wavelength of the signal to function properly. If wavelength of the signal is too long (Frequency is too low) when compared to the cross section of the waveguide, the electromagnetic fields cannot propagate. The lowest frequency range at which a waveguide will operate is where the cross section is large enough to fit one complete wavelength of the signal.

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WR6 | WG29 | R1400 Waveguide

WR6 | WG29 | R1400 – Rectangular Waveguide Size

WR6 | WG29 | R1400 Waveguide Size

  • EIA Standard:WR6
  • RSCS Standard (British Military):WG29
  • IEC Standard:R1400

WR6 Specifications

  • Recommended Frequency Band:110 to 170 GHz
  • Cutoff Frequency of Lowest Order Mode:90.791 GHz
  • Cutoff Frequency of Upper Mode:181.583 GHz
  • Dimension:0.065 Inches [1.651 mm] x 0.0325 Inches [0.8255 mm]

 

Microwave Waveguide WR2300
Microwave Waveguide

What is a Waveguide?

A waveguide is an electromagnetic feed line that is used for high frequency signals. Waveguides conduct microwave energy at lower loss than coaxial cables and are used in microwave communications, radars and other high frequency applications.

The waveguide must have a certain minimum cross section, relative to the wavelength of the signal to function properly. If wavelength of the signal is too long (Frequency is too low) when compared to the cross section of the waveguide, the electromagnetic fields cannot propagate. The lowest frequency range at which a waveguide will operate is where the cross section is large enough to fit one complete wavelength of the signal.

For Further Information

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WR8 | WG28 | R1200 Waveguide

WR8 | WG28 | R1200 Rectangular Waveguide Size

WR8 | WG28 | R1200 Waveguide Size

  • EIA Standard (British Military):WR8
  • RSCS Standard:WG28
  • IEC Standard:R1200

WR8 Specifications

  • Recommended Frequency Band:90 to 140 GHz
  • Cutoff Frequency of Lowest Order Mode:73.768 GHz
  • Cutoff Frequency of Upper Mode:147.536 GHz
  • Dimension:0.08 Inches [2.032 mm] x 0.04 Inches [1.016 mm]

 

Microwave Waveguide WR2300
Microwave Waveguide

What is a Waveguide?

A waveguide is an electromagnetic feed line that is used for high frequency signals. Waveguides conduct microwave energy at lower loss than coaxial cables and are used in microwave communications, radars and other high frequency applications.

The waveguide must have a certain minimum cross section, relative to the wavelength of the signal to function properly. If wavelength of the signal is too long (Frequency is too low) when compared to the cross section of the waveguide, the electromagnetic fields cannot propagate. The lowest frequency range at which a waveguide will operate is where the cross section is large enough to fit one complete wavelength of the signal.

For Further Information

For More Information on Microwave Planning, Please Contact Us